Writing a religious iconography

Writing About Art Iconographic Analysis Considering a work of art in terms of the life of the person who made it creates one kind of historical context.

Writing a religious iconography

In the Orthodox Christian tradition, icons are said to be written, not painted. We visited an iconographer, Maria Leontovitsch Manley, in her Bethesda, Maryland studio to learn more about the process, which can take days, often weeks, for just one icon. She also showed us how she decorates eggs for Orthodox Easter celebrations.

Before I start work, I like to say a prayer.

Religious symbolism and iconography - Icons and systems of iconography | benjaminpohle.com

And I usually go into a room where I have an icon corner. Writing an icon is a form of prayer. Each brushstroke is like a form of meditation. You have to have that inner peace. The process of writing an icon starts with the wooden board — the central area carved out, which is typical for Russian icons.

The image of Christ is put into an ark. That wood is covered with cheesecloth.

Iconographic Analysis - Writing About Art

A gesso is prepared, which is made of rabbit-skin glue and chalk and water. And this is brushed onto the cheesecloth. I incised the drawing into the gesso with an etching tool. Before the gold can be applied, the area to be gilded has to be burnished and sanded, burnished and sanded several times until a perfectly smooth finish is achieved.

If there are any imperfections, they will show through the gold.

writing a religious iconography

The gold is so thin. I use carat gold leaf, which comes in a book of 24 sheets. I breathe on it. So we remember this when we breathe on the gold. After two layers of gold you can burnish it to a bright shine. The paints are mixed with an egg emulsion. I use a yolk and mix it with water; take my powdered pigments, put a little bit in a mussel shell; add my egg-yolk mixture; use my finger to grind my pigments.

In the Russian tradition, we use a very liquid paint and a puddling technique.Iconographic Analysis. Considering a work of art in terms of the life of the person who made it creates one kind of historical context.

There are many other ways to relate a work to history, though, involving different elements of the period from which it came. 3. Essay Question Related Directly to Readings: The issue of images in Byzantine art The lineage and use of images in Byzantine art is perhaps on of the more interesting and complicated aspects of Christian iconography.

The Christian imagery in Byzantine art, as noted in Heaven on Earth, became intertwined with imperial icons and ceremony. Iconographic Analysis.

The nature of religious symbols and symbolization

Panofsky used the same method to interpret Northern Renaissance paintings that did not have religious subjects. His discussion of Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Wedding (National The only problem with likening these types of writing to the Gothic works he was analyzing is that they did not exist in sacred contexts.

Religious symbolism and iconography: Religious symbolism and iconography, respectively, the basic and often complex artistic forms and gestures used as a kind of key to convey religious concepts and the visual, auditory, and kinetic representations of religious ideas and events.

Symbolism and iconography have been utilized by all the. Iconography, as a branch of art history, studies the identification, that the writing on the rear wall in the Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck turned the painting into the record of a marriage contract. Iconography in religious art.

BOB ABERNETHY, anchor: Now, “writing” religious icons. In the Orthodox Christian tradition, icons are said to be written, not painted. The Orthodox consider making icons more a form of prayer.

Icons Are Not "Written" - Orthodox History